Saturday, August 08, 2015

Toes—Closed Toes

The beaded blue socks are done—Finally! A week short of two months in progress. I did get a lot of other stuff done as I didn't work on these socks; pillow case embroidered, and lace added, 2 pairs of sneakers embroidered, (one pair with lots of fancy embroidery, one pair with just a touch) and other stuff done, too.

But, finally they are finished.

In many ways they are just generic socks. In a few ways, they are special.

1—The Cast On. Working flat, I used an Italian cast on, for a smooth rounded over invisible edge. I follow the cast on edge with 2 rounds of simple double knitting, to make a small tube. Then, as I joined into a round, I K2tog, and YO'ed. This created an small eyelet edge.  It was followed by 1 X 1 ribbing.

A small detail that takes the generic sock a step beyond.

2--After the 1 X 1 ribbing, some beaded decoration. No pattern, just a random number of bead, randomly placed. I used a random number generator, but a die would work, too.
To place each bead (all pre-strung) I slid the bead up to the right needle, and then pulled the bead through the stitch as I knit it. The bead sat on the right leg of stitch. In the next round, carefully working the stitch locked the bead in place.

3—I beaded every other round, and placed fewer beads each round—at first, about 1 bead every 3rd stitch, in the end one bead ever 6th stitch (on average)

After the beading, I continued in simple stocking knit.

The heel was worked in heel stitch, but with a 2 stitch selvage on each side of garter, not a chain stitch.  I like the look of the garter selvage, and it's just as easy to use to pick up stitches.

There are several different turnings—Mine started with knit to middle, +1, then 2tog, then wrap & turn. This is a somewhat pointy turning (but not quite as pointy as a handkerchief turn),

The gussets were generic, too, nothing special about decreasing every other row.

The toes are the flat (or French) style—once again, a simple basic, generic style.

I decreased from 60 stitches (to start) down to 16—or about 75% of the stitches. This too is pretty normal, then I grafted the toes closed- often end up with 8 stitches on top and bottom of the toe.

I did do one special thing on the toes. Many knitters complain that grafted toes often have “ears” --that the sides of the graft stick up, and have these little points--(mine don't) here is the secret—Make reverse decreases in the first 2 stitches of last row.

Normally, I knit 2, decrease (SSK), knit till 4 stitches are left, decrease,(K2tog) and knit 2 (on both top (instep) and bottom (sole) of the toe. --Since I work my socks 2 at a time on 2 circ's, this is exactly what I do on a single needle!--and I decrease every other round.

On the last round, I start with knit 2 tog, then knit all the stitches in the center, and end with SSK--

I have charted it—the X in the chart is any number (4 for me, most often, but sometimes 6, and sometimes as few as 2--
(NOTE: X=4, +2 stitches either side, plus the first and last stitches--a total of 8 stitches left to be grafted--
NOTE 2: the table grid didn't start with 30 stitches.)

The grey blocks are NO stitch. The G's represent the graft. The two reversed decreases on the “edge” of the toe eliminate the ears. Try it for your self!



No “Ear” toe decreases (work on instep and sole side of toe)


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