Thursday, March 29, 2018

The Days Go By


Tuesday:

Every last detail of both the pink skirt and yellow shirt dress have been completed Both are hanging up in my closet, awaiting there debuts.

The claret skirt got started on Tuesday—edges finished with an over-lock stitch, interfacing ironed on, and even some sewing done. By the time I was done with sewing for the day, the pieces (2 front, pieces, one back, and a waist) had been sewn, but not assembled. I went through 2 bobbins of thread!

I experimented with doing some machine embroider on the back patch pockets—and I didn't like the look—so there is only one back patch pocket—the experiment was discarded.

Wednesday morning, skirt fronts got sewn to the skirt back with all the little details for the set in pockets completed, too. All the seam were pressed, and threads were trimmed. I marked out the button holes for later. I plan to  added an extra buttonhole/button on the center front—the placement was just a little short of what I prefer. There will be an extra button on the waist band, too—for sure.

Later in the day came the hem. I decided to go with a narrow rolled hem—I want this skirt a bit longer. Most often, I like my skirts just below knee length—and rarely make a mid calf length—And rarer still, above the knee. The narrow rolled hem will make this skirt just an inch longer than average—Not much at all. This is a heavy weight fall/winter skirt—a little bit of extra length is nice on a cold weather skirt.

I will extended the waist band a little past center front, too, to fit two button/buttonholes. I am in the practice of cutting my waist bands 3 or 4 inches longer than required—when I am adding side seam pockets, and using the inside pocket as a placket (instead of adding a zipper) so my waist bands need some extra length--to accommadate. Habits (like cutting a few extra inches of waist band) die hard. I have some extra waist band length, extending the waist band an inch on both sides of the center front will be easy. The trimmed excess will become my scrap material for a practice buttonhole. Right now, the waist band is pinned, but not even basted

Saturdays work will start with the waist band, and then will be all the buttonholes and the hand finishing...

This skirt likely won't be worn this spring—it is a really heavy gros grain (yes, like the ribbon) fabric, and will only be worn if April like March, continues to be an extension of winter. Snow is not unknown in April (the last recorded day of frost isn't till April 17th!) I made it now, because, well it's turn was up. I have some more summery/spring things in my queue—a piece of sky blue, and some more yellow—but I wanted to get this made—when I run out of steam in the fall, I will have this skirt waiting for me.

Button holes marked with shoes.
I even have a pair of shoes (well slip on sneakers) that will go  with this skirt, and the pink skirt, and even with the dark purple skirts (next months first project). I actually bought these last year, about the same time that I bought the fabric-Another reason this fall/skirt is part of my springtime sewing. 

Not as good a match--but....
I am excited by my progress—When I upgraded to new hangers, I cleaned out some skirts that I really just didn't wear—leaving room for new stuff. One dress (thread bare, but I really liked it!) was more than 25 years old. The advantage of being a clothes horse, is: you have so many clothes, each piece only gets worn a few times a year—so pieces last for ever. I still have other pieces that date back the early 1990's--they too are beginning to look worn out, and will soon find their way into the trash bin.That old dress, that I really liked? It will be cut apart, and turned into a pattern—and be resurrected in a new color. Between this year and last, I have added (and plan to add more) my wardrobe—but less talked about is how many pieces have been culled.


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